16th Annual British Philosophy of Sport Association Conference 2019 – Trinity College, Oxford, April 2nd-5th

Call for Abstracts

British Philosophy of Sport Association 16th Annual Conference – Trinity College, Oxford, April 2nd-5th, 2019.

Venue: Trinity College, Oxford
Date: Tuesday 2nd April – Friday 5th April 2019

Please note this years conference is being hosted by The Open University at Oxford Universities Trinity College. You can access The Open Universities conference webpage via this link: http://fass.open.ac.uk/research/BPSAconference.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

  • Tom Hurka (University of Toronto)
  • Sophie-Grace Chappell (Open University)
  • Julian Savulescu (Oxford University)
  • Angela Schneider (University of Western Ontario)
  • Mike McNamee (Swansea University)

For more information on this years keynote speakers please click here (you will be re-directed to the conference page ran by The Open University).

The Call for Abstracts is Now Open!!!

Guidelines for Abstract Submission:

Abstracts are invited in any area of the philosophy of sport and from any philosophical perspective: all decisions will be made solely on the basis of the quality of philosophical argument.

  • We are happy to receive abstract submissions any time from now
  • Abstract (300-500 words) final submission date – Friday 1st February 2019
  • Accepted abstracts will receive notification by – Friday 15th February 2019
  • Required format is MS Word, 12pt, single spacing, with indicative bibliography
  • Abstracts to be submitted electronically to J.E.Pike@open.ac.uk with <your name – ABSTRACT – title> as the filename.
  • Papers must be prepared in English. The Programme Committee are very keen to encourage contributors to submit early versions of abstracts or papers for comment and for advice on language issues.

For those of you who are active on social media make sure to follow us on twitter for all conference reminders and updates.
Twitter Handle: @BritPhilofSport
Conference Hashtag: #BPSAox2019

Conference Registration and Fees

  • TBC

Draft Programme

  • TBC

15th Annual British Philosophy of Sport Association Conference 2018 – Swansea, April 12th-14th

We are pleased to announce the 2018 Conference of the British Philosophy of Sport Association will be hosted by The School of Sport & Exercise Sciences, Swansea University, Wales, UK, April 12-14 ,   2018.

Venue: The College of Engineering, Bay Campus, Swansea University

The Call for Abstracts is Now Open!

Guidelines for Abstract Submission:

  • Abstract (200-300 words) final submission date – 29th January 2018
  • Accepted abstracts will receive notification by – 12th February 2018
  • Required format is MS Word, Times New Roman 12pt, single spacing, with indicative bibliography; all to fit on one side of A4.
  • Abstracts to be submitted electronically to j.w.devine@swansea.ac.uk with <your name – ABSTRACT – title> as the filename.
  • Papers must be prepared in English. The Programme Committee are very keen to encourage contributors to submit early versions of abstracts or papers for comment and for advice on language issues.

 

 

 

2017 BPSA and EAPS conference: CFA

We are pleased to announce the 2017 Conference of the British Philosophy of Sport Association European Association for the Philosophy of Sport, which will be hosted by Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands, April 24th-26th, 2017.

Venue: Conference Centre De Poort https://www.depoort.org/index.php?url=/content/en/home.html

We will also visit Radboud University Nijmegen and the Dutch Bicyle Centre.

The call for Abstract is now open!

Guidelines for Abstract Submission:

  • Abstract (200-300 words) final submission date – 10th FEB 2017
  • Accepted abstracts will receive notification by – 1st MARCH 2017
  • Required format is MS Word, Times New Roman 12pt, single spacing, with indicative bibliography; all to fit on one side of A4.
  • Abstracts to be submitted electronically to EAPS.PhilS@gmail.com with <your name – ABSTRACT – title> as the filename.
  • Papers must be prepared in English. The Programme Committee are very keen to encourage contributors to submit early versions of abstracts or papers for comment and for advice on language issues.

Conference Registration and Fees:

 The conference fee will be approx. 300/350euro (depending on room type & all inclusive: 2 overnight stays including breakfast; two buffet dinners (incl. vegetarian options); three lunches (idem) and free coffee, tea, fruit and biscuit during the conference). Arriving on Sunday and/or leaving on Thursday is 45/70 euro extra per night (depending on type of room, incl. breakfast).

Registration (including hotel reservation) via Conference Centre De Poort. Payment at arrival.

Publication:

  • Final papers may be considered for publication in a range of journals associated in various ways with BPSA and its members, in accordance with normal submission guidelines, e.g: Sport, Ethics and PhilosophyJournal of the Philosophy of Sport; Acta Universitatis Carolinae– KinanthropologicaFilosofie & Praktijk 

Transport:

  • Nearest Airport: Weeze (Germany)
  • Eindhoven Airport
  • Amsterdam Airport (Schiphol)
  • Nearest Railway Station: Nijmegen Central Station

Enquiries:

Queries should be directed to the Conference Organiser: Ron Welters, r.welters@science.ru.nl

 

Philosophy of Medicine and Sport workshop

Tom Douglas

Tom Douglas

The next meeting of the Philosophy of Medicine and Sport Workshop will take place on Tuesday, 5 May, 5.30-7.00 p.m. in K0.19, King’s College London, Strand Campus.

Tom Douglas​ (Oxford) will speak on ‘Enhancement and Desert’.

Tom is a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and a Golding Junior Fellow at Brasenose College, Oxford.

All welcome to attend.

 

Abstract

It is sometimes claimed that those who succeed with the aid of biomedical enhancement technologies deserve the rewards associated with their success less, other things being equal, than those who succeed through training or education. This claim captures some widely held intuitions, has been implicitly endorsed by participants in social-psychological research, and helps to undergird two otherwise puzzling objections to the use of enhancement technologies: that enhancement produces unfair advantages, and that it undermines the value of human achievement. I consider whether the claim can be provided with a rational basis by examining three arguments that might be offered in its favour. These appeal respectively to the views that desert is diminished by the adoption of morally undesirable means, the avoidance of effort, and the partial responsibility of others for our achievements.